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21st June, 2017

The History Of The CDM Regulations

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (CDM Regulations), like many things, have changed and developed over time. The history of the CDM Regulations actually goes back over 20 years!

The current 2015 were not the first time you needed a Construction Phase Plan, but are the first introduction to the role of the Principal Designer.

Some roles (the Planning Supervisor, the CDM Coordinator) have come and gone along the way.

But the fundamental idea of improving health and safety in construction has remained.

Let’s take a look at the history of the CDM Regulations.

1994

Step back in time to 1994, well actually, CDM 1994 came into force in March 95 but let us not confuse things!

CDM 1994 was the first version of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations, introducing the roles of the Planning Supervisor and the Principal Contractor, and the need to notify the HSE.

It introduced CDM roles and responsibilities, much less on the Client compared to the rest of the project team, and introduced the health and safety plan.

While the Principal Contractor role has stood the test of time, the Planning Supervisor is confined to the history books after this set of the Regulations.

2007

Fast forward to 2007 and after more than 12 years the next generation of CDM comes into force.

This set of Regulations now includes welfare requirements combing with prior Construction (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations into the CDM umbrella.

Gone is the Planning Supervisor, and in its place, the new CDM Coordinator. Also introduced are the Pre-Construction Information, the Health and Safety File, and the health and safety plan becomes known as the Construction Phase Plan.

More emphasis is placed on Client duties, with the exception of domestic clients and their projects.

2015

Only 8 years this time before the next version of CDM is introduced.

This time the CDM Coordinator gets the chop and a new duty holder is introduced, the Principal Designer.

The Principal Designer now takes on responsibility of health and safety at the pre-construction phase, with the Principal Contractor responsible during the construction phase.

Once again, more emphasis is placed on the Client, now also in charge of notification to the HSE.

Documentation, appointment and notification requirements are tweaked slightly, and the exemption for domestic projects is gone. Domestic clients still get a free pass, but other duties holders must still fully comply with all the requirements on domestic projects.

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