Does CDM Apply To Painting And Decorating? header image

23rd May, 2018

Does CDM Apply To Painting And Decorating?

Painters and decorators are often familiar with CDM from working on larger construction projects, perhaps under a principal contractor. But what about smaller projects, like painting a hallway or a room in someone's house?

Does CDM apply when you are working in occupied buildings or someones home? Let's take a look.

CDM stands for the Construction (Design & Management) Regulations. As the name suggests, CDM applies to construction work. In fact, CDM is a set of health and safety regulations that apply specifically to construction projects.

What CDM says about painting and decorating.

It's not unusual for painters to think that if they are working on their own, in a customers house, that no construction work is being carried out. But actually, it is.

The CDM regulations set out information for what is classed as construction work.

2. Interpretation.

construction work means the carrying out of any building, civil engineering or engineering construction work and includes—

(a) the construction, alteration, conversion, fitting out, commissioning, renovation, repair, upkeep, redecoration or other maintenance (including cleaning which involves the use of water or an abrasive at high pressure, or the use of corrosive or toxic substances), de-commissioning, demolition or dismantling of a structure;

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015

As you can see, redecoration comes within the definition of construction work.

What does this mean? It means even if no other contractors or construction work is involved in your project, as a painter and decorator, you need to be aware of CDM.

When a principal contractor is required.

Any, and every, construction project with more than one contractor needs to have a principal contractor.

If you are working as a painter and decorator for a client, and no other contractors are involved in the project, and you won't be appointing any subcontractors, then a principal contractor is not needed.

If there are any other contractors or subcontractors involved, then you must have a principal contractor.

The principal contractor will have overall control of the project and has some extra responsibilities, such as preparing the construction phase plan, organising the works and managing health and safety on site.

If you are the only contractor, you must prepare the construction phase plan and are responsible for health and safety on site.

Working on domestic projects.

What about domestic projects, working in someone's house, are you not exempt from CDM?

Nope.

Domestic clients have their client duties transferred to other members of the project team, that could be you. And on top of this, as a contractor, you still have the same CDM duties as any other project.

In fact, on a domestic project with multiple contractors, the principal contractor can be appointed automatically.

How to comply with CDM.

Ok, so now we know that CDM will apply to your projects, how do you comply with it as a painter and decorator?

First of all, you will be glad to know that CDM is proportional. You are not expected to have the same procedures in place as say, a big demolition project. If you have good health and safety systems in place, you are probably well on your way to complying with CDM.

But, there are a few extra duties you should be aware of, whether you are a principal contractor or a contractor.

The good news is, we have some free CDM guides to help you.

Need CDM Help?

Get CDM support on your construction projects with our free guides and support packs for all duty holders.

CDM Support

Recent posts like this...

Can The Client Be The Principal Contractor Under CDM?

It is possible for the same person or organisation to be both the client, and the principal contractor under CDM. However, there are projects where the client should be the principal contractor and projects where they shouldn't. In this blog post we consider each situation.

Read Post

Construction Phase Plans Explained (What, When, Who And Why)

What is a construction phase plan? When is it required, and who writes it? A construction phase plan is a document required under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (CDM). In this blog post we explain the what, when, who and why of construction phase plans.

Read Post

Considering Construction Buildability In CDM Design

When carrying out design work for a building project, it is important to consider buildability, it's a legal duty under CDM for all designers. But, what exactly does buildability mean? In the context of CDM, buildability is simply, the ability to build the structure safely.

Read Post

HASpod makes health and safety simple.

Learn More